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Clojure

since 2007 (earliest usage recorded on this site was 2007)

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Users

Technology Timeline Graph
 
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
fogus
dfan
tswicegood
cstejerean
Zak
adityo
jdunck
ntoll
Cema
dublindan
bittercoder
gtani7
jjames
ghoseb
mallipeddi
twhitton
Ben
newman
kan
Swizec
gnubardt
yacitus
gridaphobe
mgrbyte
fogus - 11 years
dfan - 10 years
tswicegood - 10 years
cstejerean - 10 years
Zak - 10 years
adityo - 10 years
jdunck - 10 years
ntoll - 9 years
Cema - 9 years
dublindan - 9 years
bittercoder - 9 years
gtani7 - 9 years
jjames - 9 years
ghoseb - 9 years
mallipeddi - 9 years
twhitton - 9 years
Ben - 9 years
newman - 8 years
kan - 8 years
Swizec - 8 years
gnubardt - 8 years
yacitus - 8 years
gridaphobe - 7 years
mgrbyte - 3 years
2007–
Came across Clojure while developing my own Scheme variant. Work on said Scheme variant soon stopped in favor of using Clojure instead.
2008–
First started playing with it in late 2008. In late 2008 or early 2009 I was one of a bevy of tech reviewers for Stuart Halloway's Programming Clojure book from Pragmatic Bookshelf and spent some time with the language. I've never had a reason to use it in a live environment, but would definitely reach for it if I was deploying code that had to live in the JVM.
2008–
When I first tried Clojure, I got the sense than Rich Hickey was reading my mind and creating just the language features I needed right before I needed them. It quickly became a language of choice.
2008–
2008–
Having been not-entirely-satisfied with Erlang and curious about Lisps (I've watched most of the SICP lectures but never used Lisp for real), I was glad to see Clojure. JVM + Lisp + concurrency primitives + cheap immutable structures. Wow. There's no rebuttal of Amdahl's law, but this is as close as we'll get, I say.
2008–
2008–
2009–
First heard of / tried out Clojure last year. Have been attending London dojos and determined to get this one under my belt.
2009–
Learned about at a Lisp conference. Learning it now (2010).
2009–
2009–
Have been learning Clojure since late 2009. Mostly by reading the "Programming Clojure" book by Halloway.
2009–
A data structures and algo playground.
2009–
Learning a variety of lisps and taking an interest in non-java JVM languages, I was a natural sucker for Clojure. My current wish-I-could-build-everything-in-it language. And I will, just you wait. Why are you laughing?
2009–
2009–
Ahh, my new favorite language. I always wanted to have the fabled Lisp epiphany, and Clojure is the closest I've come. It's pragmatic, elegant, and full of magic. Clojure is the only language that compels me to program for fun.
2009–
Dabbled in Clojure -- haven't yet done anything substantial with Clojure yet.
2009–
2010–
Getting my feet wet.
2010–
2010–
2010–
I just started playing with it as I read Seven Languages in Seven Weeks by Bruce Tate (http://bit.ly/cmNUWU) and after attending the SDForum Emerging Tech SIG: Emerging Languages Face Off (http://bit.ly/adzUej).
2010–
2011–
2015–
A lot more fun that Euh !
fun

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