to do then now would be retro, to do then then was very nowtro
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Programming Languages

Programming Languages carljm has used:

Timeline Graph
 
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
TI BASIC (TI 99/4A)
BASIC
QBasic
C
TI-BASIC
C++
bash
Javascript
PHP
Perl
sed
Java
Python
Scheme
1989–1992
First programming I ever did was on this hand-me-down "set-top box" with the static state cartridges (and oh, the games: Parsec, Donkey Kong...). I never hooked up the cassette recorder for persistent storage, so all my programs were recorded longhand in a spiral notebook and re-typed each time. I wrote a pretty massive RPG (considering), and a program that played "Happy Birthday".
1989–1996
TI-BASIC on a TI-99/4A, later the TI-83 graphing calculator and hacking Nibbles on MS QBASIC.
1992–1996
We hacked Nibbles like crazy; added stuff like wormholes/teleporters, moving/blinking walls, random debris falling from the sky... fun times.
1993–
Took lessons from my uncle. Created a 3x3 "pawn battle" graphical game for the first significant project. In college I ran a MUD based on CircleMUD and hacked on that some. I still touch C occasionally for a Python extension, but not often.
1994–1996
TI-BASIC on my TI-83 saved me from many a boring math class.
1996–2002
Ah, Borland Turbo C++. For a while, I thought this was the language "real programs" should be written in. So I tried a lot of personal projects in it before and during college, and they were mostly painful. Not much use for it nowadays.
1998–
Awful, but sometimes irresistibly practical.
1998–
Not much of a choice; if you do web work, you have to know Javascript. I started back when it was called "DHTML" and if you were doing anything serious, you pretty much had to pick your target browser first.
1998–2005
My first real programming job was building a PHP-based CMS from the ground up. It's still around, though thankfully most of the code I wrote has been rewritten since.
1998–2003
My first dynamic-language love. I remember in college taking a look at an mbox-parser a friend was struggling for hours to write in C and telling him "I could do that in Perl in ten minutes." He called the challenge; I locked my door and had it done in 9:37. Haven't used it much since I found Python.
1998–
I hesitate to call what I do with sed "programming," but I use it a fair bit.
1999
Bought a book because it seemed obvious it was "the next thing to learn" after C/C++, but never even finished the book.
2002–
My preferred language. Beautiful, easy-to-read code. Learned it from Mark Pilgrim's "Dive into Python" online book while bored with PHP consulting gig.
2008–
I like to play around with Scheme (mostly for reading SICP). Haven't used it for anything real.