to do then now would be retro, to do then then was very nowtro
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Programming Languages

Programming Languages jjames has used:

Timeline Graph
 
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
Scheme
Perl
bash
BASIC
Fortran 90
Ruby
PHP
C
Python
Javascript
XSLT
AppleScript
Objective-C
Clojure
1995–
The language that taught me that I wanted to learn how to program something larger than a calculator. The smallness of the language is inspiring as a contrast to most modern language designs. Also, Guy Steele has the most boss name in history.
1995–
I was called crazy by everyone I met who had a job in software for obsessing about Perl 4. I still don't know how I found it or how it found me. Now people call me crazy for obsessing about Perl 6.
1995–
Pre-requisite for linux, especially in the terminal reliant, dark ages. It doesn't get much recognition but it's a damn fine, influential and useful language.
1995–1998
I accidentally learned BASIC on a Sharp graphing calculator (and later TI) as a side effect of trying to avoid having to memorize physics equations. Turned out that after I'd expressed them as software I couldn't forget them.
1996–1998
Learned during an internship at the Quantum Theory Project on the University of Florida campus running simulations of laser canon effects on silicone. I wrote visualization modules for IBM's Data Explorer in Fortran 90. Seriously.
1998–
I picked up Ruby before google translate and all of the documentation was in japanese. You had to put on a mining helmet and take a pick axe to the language to get any milage at all. I always assumed that had something to do with the titling of the book.
1998–2005
I did it for the money
1998–2003
I decided to learn C by building a TCP socket server which morphed into an IRC chat like system which morphed into a MUD. During this time I grew my first serious beard. It helped me think just hard enough not to segfault.
1998–
Originally learned out of curiosity arising out the Perl community's slights and jabs, Python currently dominates my software output.
2000–
I don't know if it is fair to say I completely understood the power of javascript when I first learned it (or that I do even yet). I am constantly amazed and confused by both its elegance and warts. I love them both.
2003–2005
I remember building my resume from an XML schema originally included with Gentoo documentation and a custom XSLT. That's when I knew I'd really made something of myself.
2007
If I told you why and how I've used this language, I'd have to kill you. It feels more like remorse than regret.
2009–
I discovering the vestiges of Smalltalk's beauty buried deep beneath Objective-C's absurd verbosity, I learned to see OO as a chain of call and response rather than glorified structs on a raft of philosophy. Only after that did I fall in love with the language. XCode didn't hurt.
2009–
Learning a variety of lisps and taking an interest in non-java JVM languages, I was a natural sucker for Clojure. My current wish-I-could-build-everything-in-it language. And I will, just you wait. Why are you laughing?