to do then now would be retro, to do then then was very nowtro
Log in or Sign Up

6502 Assembly

since 1975 (earliest usage recorded on this site was 1976)

more info

Login or signup to add 6502 Assembly to your list!

Users

Technology Timeline Graph
 
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
mnulli
BitWise
njr
AndyC
yacitus
empty
vangale
karmakaze
dabeaz
kan
gnat
jancona
lawley
jtauber
jorjun
growe
r1chardj0n3s
David
greyfade
af
abtin
edd
tlesher
Rich_Herds_Cats
zephyrfalcon
spookylukey
otherchirps
vvarp
boutell
rogerclark
natevw
adamv
mnulli - 25 years
BitWise - 40 years
njr - 8 years
AndyC - 7 years
yacitus - 6 years
empty - 6 years
vangale - 1 years
karmakaze - 4 years
dabeaz - 6 years
kan - 2 years
gnat - 4 years
jancona - 3 years
lawley - 36 years
jtauber - 34 years
jorjun - 2 years
growe - 34 years
r1chardj0n3s - 4 years
David - 33 years
greyfade - 4 years
af - 2 years
abtin - 1 years
edd - 30 years
tlesher - 3 years
Rich_Herds_Cats - 7 years
zephyrfalcon - 28 years
spookylukey - 28 years
otherchirps - 2 years
vvarp - 6 years
boutell - 14 years
rogerclark - 19 years
natevw - 1 years
adamv - 1 years
1976–2000
Not sure 2000 will stay my end year :-) I've lost track of how many variants of 6502 assembly I've used, E.G. the very simple one that was part of the Rockwell System 65, the FORTH assembler that was part of my first FORTH re-target, A bunch of macros from MACRO-11, and finally a set of macros on top of that to provide a "HLL65", akin to Wirth's PL360.
1978–
I first wrote 6502 code on the school's Commodore PET and later on my BBC Microcomputer. I still write 6502 for my emulators and minimal (three chip) single board computers.
1979–1985
Started on the UK-101 ended on the BBC Micro. UK-101 info page: http://www.gifford.co.uk/~coredump/uk101.htm
1979–1986
I have probably spent more time writing 6502 code than anything else; which is a bit depressing given how painful it was. I used it because it was the CPU in my BBC Micro (Model B, 32K RAM!) and wrote a number of commercial packages for AUCBE, the Advisory Centre for Computer-Based Education in Hertfordshire, including Quest (a database) and Alpha, a word processor / macro editor.
1980–1985
Started with this processor with the Vic-20. Continued with it on the Apple ][e. Great processor.
1980–1985
I first started playing with 6502 assembly on the Commodore PETs as I deciphered the PEEKs & POKEs in programs I typed into them from various books and magazines. (There was one programmer who wrote the majority of the programs I found interesting and elegant, but I'm ashamed I can't remember—or find—his name.) I started "real" 6502 programming on the Atari 800 my dad bought me when I was (I think) 15. (And I even had a summer job after my first year of university (1983) mainly writing assembly on an Atari 800. I also had a job perhaps that same summer writing some assembly on a Commodore 64.) I may have written the last of my 6502 assembly the next year for a summer job in Toronto, writing software to teach BASIC programming.
1980
Tried to use this to write a lisp interpreter on my Apple ][ based on descriptions in Winston's "Artificial Intelligence". Not knowing lisp was a major roadblock and, suprisingly, the project was an utter failure.
1981–1986
Initially wrote short assembly functions on an Ohio Scientific Superboard II. Later moved to writing assembly language on the Apple 2 for games. Later implemented a 3D graphics/plotting library for the Apple 2 in about 5000 lines of assembly.
1981–1984
De Re Atari
1982–1985
Learned on the C=64. Still remember that $A9 was LDA in 6502 machine code, which is a startlingly useless fact that I'll take to my grave. Never managed to get an assembler working on the C64, so I assembled all my programs by hand on graph paper. I appreciate my tools now.
1982–1984
Wrote a device driver so my VIC-20 could print to an IBM electronic typewriter.
1982–1983
1982–
1984–
Learnt this on the Apple ][
1984–1985
Learned this on the BBC Micro, wrote a disassembler so I could try and understand how RocketRaid worked :p
1984–
Wrote a few simple 6502 programs for my old Commodore 64, mainly as an exercise to see how it worked.
1984–1987
My first assembler; also my first ever "scrolling text demo" (text scrolled across a screen using left shift opcode).
1985–
1986–1989
After seeing several programs that put a bunch of DATA statements at the bottom of the LIST and GOTO'd them, I decided to learn what that was about. Discovered that my Epyx FastLoad cartridge had a debugging assembler, so I started following the examples in my programmer's reference.
1987–1988
1987
1988–
1988–1990
After seeing one too many commercial games that appeared to consist of one line of BASIC (10 SYS 49152, of course), I started learning 6502 assembly language. I used an APPLE II programmer's guide and list of system routine addresses hand-copied from a friend's C64 Programmer's Reference to hand-code machine language. When I got to college and learned what an "assembler" was, I wept for the midnight hours I lost recalculating relative BNE/BEQ addresses after inserting instructions.
1989–1995
BBC B, and embedded systems. This was how we were taught to program properly at High School. Having to enter entire programs using a single digit, seven segment display teaches you to think about what you are doing.
1990–1991
1990–
1990–
1994–1999
Atari 8bit demoscene FTW
1995–2008
I came to this very late, wanting to write a retro Atari 2600 game (technically the 6507, but it's the same instruction set, minus useful interrupts and with harsh memory limits). I built an Atari emulator in 1995 and discarded it because it seemed implausible that it would ever be fast enough; whoops, Moore's law wasn't dead yet. In the early aughts I put in some time toward a couple of games and made some functioning demos, but never muscled through to produce a cartridge game. Meanwhile the fad has (again) passed. Probably time to face up to it and sell my Starpath Supercharger.
1999–
2002
Dabbled in this a bit by poking raw opcodes from BASIC, but didn't get much working.
2009
A little.
Following my investigation, billions of people all over the world receive the <a href="http://goodfinance-blog.com/topics/home-loans">home loans</a> at good creditors. Thence, there's a good chance to find a bank loan in all countries.

Login or signup to add 6502 Assembly to your list!