to do then now would be retro, to do then then was very nowtro
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Assembly

since unknown year (earliest usage recorded on this site was 1964)

Assembly languages are a type of low-level languages for programming computers, microprocessors, microcontrollers, and other (usually) integrated circuits. They implement a symbolic representation of the numeric machine codes and other constants needed to program a particular CPU architecture. This representation is usually defined by the hardware manufacturer, and is based on abbreviations (called mnemonics) that help the programmer remember individual instructions, registers, etc. An assembly language family is thus specific to a certain physical (or virtual) computer architecture. This is in contrast to most high-level languages, which are (ideally) portable.

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rragan
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BitWise
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rrainey
bhaugen
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ndw
Erik
Cema
reed
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b_eide
dl
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bob
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Bunglebogs
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enki
shiny
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bg4
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notanumber
audreyr
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bkopanja
CerealBoy
bitprophet
anoop
mgrbyte
osiixy
iamteem
Vector
bkokash
barneyboo
beshrkayali
sirish
dmnd
dan
Kanru
brutasse
gg
andyrak
fisadev
NX172
chrisbrett665
ch0llima
gabrielrios
moriogawa
ranman
gridaphobe
Da_Nuke
mcbuddha
choko01
rragan - 54 years
holdenweb - 8 years
sceptreofjudah - 21 years
jancona - 2 years
tttallis - 6 years
BitWise - 42 years
danceswithvowels - 16 years
rrainey - 42 years
bhaugen - 3 years
avowkind - 12 years
codewritinfool - 38 years
brucehoult - 38 years
lawley - 38 years
jtauber - 35 years
ndw - 10 years
Erik - 33 years
Cema - 33 years
reed - 6 years
undoingemptyvoid - 5 years
b_eide - 29 years
dl - 29 years
thumper - 1 years
bob - 24 years
jdunck - 2 years
mpirnat - 2 years
Bunglebogs - 22 years
johnny723 - 1 years
enki - 21 years
shiny - 20 years
binarydud - 1 years
bg4 - 3 years
kratorius - 8 years
smalltobi - 16 years
notanumber - 1 years
audreyr - 2 years
daniellindsley - 1 years
bkopanja - 2 years
CerealBoy - 2 years
bitprophet - 1 years
anoop - 7 years
mgrbyte - 2 years
osiixy - 15 years
iamteem - 2 years
Vector - 2 years
bkokash - 6 years
barneyboo - 2 years
beshrkayali - 13 years
sirish - 1 years
dmnd - 1 years
dan - 1 years
Kanru - 12 years
brutasse - 1 years
gg - 4 years
andyrak - 11 years
fisadev - 1 years
NX172 - 11 years
chrisbrett665 - 11 years
ch0llima - 11 years
gabrielrios - 1 years
moriogawa - 9 years
ranman - 3 years
gridaphobe - 1 years
Da_Nuke - 8 years
mcbuddha - 8 years
choko01 - 8 years
1964–
1401 Autocoder
1968–1975
1970–1990
I learned assembly in college. Actually it was mainly machine code. I went on to learning 4004, 8008, then started work in 1977. I spent 2 years doing intensive video game programming using just 8080 machine code and prom blasters. I guess you might call it assembly. Finally, we got to the point where we could afford an Intel MDS and stopped the hand coding.
1973–1974
Symbo C assembler on a Monrobot XI at my high school. I wrote a football simulation game.
1975–1980
I used Assembly (and also machine code) throughout high school. I was fortunate enough to attend the first school in Australia to have a computer available for student use (a Digital PDP8/E). My father also gave me some access to a computer he had at his office.
1976–1991
Real-time kernels, drivers, applications, and diagnostics for Motorola 6800, PDP-11 (RSX-11S/M/M+) and VAX (VMS).
1976–
1976–
Cut my teeth on ICL 4-30 assembler (basically IBM 3/60 with some of the good bits removed) on the school main frame. Still write in assembly for various micro-controllers and micro-processors for fun.
1978–1980
On IBM 360's, maintaining a set of programs that modified themselves as they ran. Drove me nuts.
1979–1990
First assembler was Z80 on the Sinclair ZX80. I disassembled the rom and then poked a new program in. Later 1800 - 1806, then Intel family and 6800 -> 68000, Then ARM. I love the ARM.
1980–
Have done almost everything popular except x86. 1980: 6502, 1981: Z80 and PDP11, 1982: VAX, 1983: Z8000, 1984: 6809 and 68000, 1994: PowerPC, 1999: MIPS, 2006: ARM and Thumb.
1980–
1980–
1983–
Dabbled with 6809 Assembly then moved to 6502. Have occasionally used x86 but it seems awful in comparison.
1985–
Studied IBM/360 assembler in college. Learned some x86 assembly later.
1985–1990
Atari 8-bit 6502
1985–1994
1985–
1986–1990
Implemented parts of a pre-compiler for COBOL programs using a HDBMS access API, an interactive interpreter and core libraries for the HDBMS. All using IBM BAL/360. Weird non-stack based language.
1989–
1989–
1992
Part of Comp.Sci degree. Never want to touch it again.
1994–
1995–1996
Learned for college, played with it a little outside class. Enough to appreciate how the machine works, enough to welcome C.
1995–1996
1996–
1997
Learn it in a computer science course, couldn't even remember what type of assembly language it was. I only remember we used a PowerPC for practicing.
1997–
1998–
Z80 counts, right?
1999
2000–2007
2000–2002
MIPS R2000
2002–
I programmed a steering program for a watering system which ran on a PIC 16F84. Later on I also learned X86 Assembler and PPC Assembler. I used PPC assembler to port a network driver for an old Motorola chip.
2002
2002–2003
2002
2003
Computer hardware/architecture course in university. ARM is pretty awesome. Still don't know x86 and now there's no point learning PPC...
2003–2009
2003–2004
2003–2004
2003–2004
Used it at college for a class
2003–2004
2003–
2003–2004
2004–2009
First was at Z80 processors in university, then got more involved in 8051 and RISC based microcontollors.
2005–2006
Briefly flirted with in last year of high school but not a vision of the world I want to look at again.
2005–
not very much though... just for my game hacking needs (creating trainers, etc...)
2005
Used in college
2006
2006
Microcontrollers.
2006
2006–
2006–2009
Mostly for optimization on the Cell SPU. Some Power and x86.
2007–
2007–
Taught some basic MIPS-2000 assembly using the SPIM simulator on a University course. Complicated, but seemed so rewarding when stuff finally worked.
2007
Class in college
2007
Only at university, very very basic.
2007–
2007–
2009–
2009–2011
MIPS and x86
2009
One of the most interesting CS courses I've taken, even though I'd never want to write Assembly again :P
2010–
Intel 8051 assembly here. It fucking rules because unlike high-level languages, you know exactly what your program is doing at all times, and because using it is using hardware directly. The only lower-level thing that exists is VHDL and that's because it's a hardware description language, not a programming language.
2010–
2010–
for fun with jedi/sectorone

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