to do then now would be retro, to do then then was very nowtro
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x86 Assembly

since 1979 (earliest usage recorded on this site was 1981)

The Intel 8088 and 8086 CPUs were 16-bit CPUs that first had an instruction set that is now commonly referred to as x86, they were an evolution of the previous generation of 8-bit CPUs such as the 8080, inheriting many characteristics and instructions, extended for the 16-bit era. The 8088 and 8086 both used a 20-bit address bus and 16-bit internal registers but whilst the 8086 had a 16-bit data bus, the 8088, intended as a low cost option for embedded applications, had an 8-bit data bus. The x86 assembly language covers the many different versions of CPUs that followed, from Intel; the 80188, 80186, 80286, 80386, 80486, Pentium as well as non-Intel CPUs from AMD and Cyrix such as the 5x86 and K6 processors. The term x86 applies to any CPU which can run the original assembly language (usually it will run at least some of the extensions too).

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Technology Timeline Graph
 
1981
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vangale
sceptreofjudah
undoingemptyvoid
karmakaze
abtin
fdrake
AndyC
codewritinfool
RCARDENES
boutell
cloudssanswater
dl
dabeaz
Uche
bittercoder
sfaruque
greyfade
ndw
David
drakkos
givas
enki
mnulli
vvarp
rogerclark
randombit
rizumu
madewulf
eddymul
ghoseb
jtauber
quakehead
Josh
bkopanja
z3d
daniellindsley
CerealBoy
cstejerean
adamcik
Kanru
bibhas
smalltobi
thaostra
cagedmantis
akgerber
NX172
natevw
ranman
alexsuraci
vangale - 9 years
sceptreofjudah - 7 years
undoingemptyvoid - 1 years
karmakaze - 22 years
abtin - 31 years
fdrake - 10 years
AndyC - 7 years
codewritinfool - 31 years
RCARDENES - 30 years
boutell - 1 years
cloudssanswater - 8 years
dl - 18 years
dabeaz - 28 years
Uche - 7 years
bittercoder - 10 years
sfaruque - 6 years
greyfade - 26 years
ndw - 1 years
David - 24 years
drakkos - 22 years
givas - 7 years
enki - 21 years
mnulli - 4 years
vvarp - 1 years
rogerclark - 19 years
randombit - 11 years
rizumu - 1 years
madewulf - 17 years
eddymul - 16 years
ghoseb - 3 years
jtauber - 15 years
quakehead - 5 years
Josh - 2 years
bkopanja - 1 years
z3d - 1 years
daniellindsley - 1 years
CerealBoy - 4 years
cstejerean - 2 years
adamcik - 1 years
Kanru - 12 years
bibhas - 11 years
smalltobi - 2 years
thaostra - 11 years
cagedmantis - 3 years
akgerber - 10 years
NX172 - 10 years
natevw - 9 years
ranman - 9 years
alexsuraci - 8 years
1981–1989
First used this on the original IBM PC with two floppy disks. Learned it from reading the BIOS source code in the IBM manuals. There weren't any good text editors in these days so I wrote one completely in 8088 assembler. Used edlin to bootstrap it to the point where it could read files, save, insert, and delete. Finished up with 100k+ lines source code, 16k binary size. Did some more in late 80's with multi-tasking code on top of MS-DOS but haven't done any other assemblers since.
1983–1989
I designed a complete upright video game system based on the 8088. After getting the board in production, coding was done in assembler on an Intel MDS. Higher-level routines were later done in 'C' using a PC with Xenix. Games: Casino Blackjack, Wild Arrow, Golden Arrow, Jokers Wild (first Joker Poker ever made), Stud Poker, Jacks 'A' Pair, etc... (Nevada Gaming).
1985
During college bought the FIG source listing for FORTH and typed it all in, x86 assembler. Then added a new function to position the cursor on the screen. Still liked Motorola better.
1985–2006
1987–1993
Used it to speed up some routines in a IBM PC program. Also low level routines on the PC for serial communication and interrupt handling
1987–1996
The first language I installed tools for on the first computer I owned, just 'cause I wanted to learn more.
1987–
1987–
1988
I wrote a replacement INT14h driver for the serial port. Anything to get your BBS to stop dropping characters...
1988–
Mainly through MS-DOS' "debug" tool. I had a x86 as first computer :(, and the programming possibilities on it (for me) back then were not that many, but I still tried to get the hang of assembly
1989–1996
1990–
Wrote a high performance SVGA graphics device driver library entirely in x86 assembler wrapped with an interface that allowed it to be called from Modula-2. Still sometimes dive into it for debugging and other low-level hacking.
1990–2007
useful for bringing python up on bare metal. cf http://en.literateprograms.org/Hello_World_(IBM_PC_bootstrap)
1990–1996
1991–2000
I mostly did "inline assembler" within C++ dialects. But also did a little MASM while studying. My love affair with assembler began after getting into the demo scene in the early 90's, where squeezing every last bit of performance out of line and texture blitting operations was important :)
1991–1996
This language introduced me into the world of programming.
1992–
Got bored with QBasic, and accidentally stumbled on the "debug" command. Immediately went on a search at the library for 8086 programming books. Peter Norton's Programmer's Guide was as a Bible to me.
1992
1994–
1996–
Learned in univeristy, plus I used to teach it a bit.
1997–2003
Not full-time. Just boot loaders and other tools for fun and testing.
1997–
1998
Brief romance (just for shit and giggles)
1998–2001
Oddly, I skipped from 8008 assembly in 1972 to "boot and get into protected mode" code for a Pentium equivalent in 1998, with only one instance of x86 assembly between, fixing a bug in the ESIX select() library call, circa 1990.
1999–
2000–2010
2001–
I taught it for 7 years. It allowed me to understand how this recursion thing really works.
2001
Took one semester of Assembly, really enjoyed the low level programming.
2002–2004
2002–
2003–
Seemed so horrible compared with my experience with the 6809, etc that I avoided it for decades. Started using it for my Cleese OS project.
2003–2006
Never. Fucking. Again.
2003
2003–2004
2003–2007
From knowing only JE, JNE, JMP, and NOP to knowing how memory management works and different operation modes is a big step.
2003
2003
2004
2004–2005
I learned assembly mostly for security related work.
2006–
2007–
Learned it at college. A huge eye opener.
2007–2008
Learned it in university and programmed small games like "connect four"
2007–
I became intrigued by ASM when I learned the difference between "high level" and "low level" languages.
2008–
lol cisc
2008–2010
2008–
2009–
Haven't written anything yet, but learned to read it for some reverse engineering.
2009–
2010–
Going as low-level as I can go (while still being a language), for the sheer fun and hackery of it.
Had to use it at University. I sometimes write useless routines in it just for fun (and to keep my mind fresh on what actually goes on "in the box").
perf dll gaming
my first exposure to assembler via dos debug(oh how i miss thee) later used in dll injection and appliction cracking/patching

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