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Programming Languages

Programming Languages gnat has used:

Timeline Graph
 
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
Commodore BASIC
6502 Assembly
Turbo Pascal
C
TeX
Modula-2
Tcl
Perl
bash
PHP
Ruby
Python
1981–1985
My first programming language on my first computer, the C=64. I still close my eyes and exhale blissfully remembering it.
1982–1985
Learned on the C=64. Still remember that $A9 was LDA in 6502 machine code, which is a startlingly useless fact that I'll take to my grave. Never managed to get an assembler working on the C64, so I assembled all my programs by hand on graph paper. I appreciate my tools now.
1985–1988
Stopped using Turbo Pascal once I learned C, but it was the first structured programming language (i.e., one with curly braces) that I ever used, and the first IDE.
1988–
Learned C on my first IBM-compatible computer. Taught myself from Kernighan and Ritchie ("the White Book"). Wrote a windowing library (like curses) for money. Then got to university and was taught about memory management and realised why the library crashed all the time.
1991–1995
I wrote html2latex back in the dark days of the interwebs, because I needed to print web pages for people. My ignorance of good C programming was only matched by my ignorance of good (La)TeX.
1991
This was the language taught in 2nd year Computer Science. What I learned from this: a brilliant idea (like Pascal) is rarely followed by more brilliant ideas.
1992
Used it third year computer science. Never used it again. "What if you could bash-script a gui?" is a question that you could ask once, but not inflict the answer on anyone else.
1992–
Picked up Perl in the early days of the web. It was used to reformat text into HTML, and of course in the elegant Plexus web server. Back then, before CGI, we got dynamic web pages by hacking the web server to do different things based on the URL. It's obviously better to do that in Perl than in C, so Perl took off. I moved to the US, helped tchrist with the FAQ which lead to the cookbook which lead to training and conferences and YAPC and perl6 and The Perl Foundation and all sorts of wonderful things. Perl was the first time I saw a community coalesce. There's something magic when people who know each other online meet for the first time in person. I've seen it happen at other conferences since, but the early days of The Perl Conference were special because it was the first time I'd seen it happen, and I was part of it. Love the Perl community just as I love Perl, warts and all. I use other programming languages from time to time, hang out in other communities from time to time, but Perl and I know each other the best.
1993–1998
Learned it doing web work, before I got the hang of Perl. Then had to use it when I worked as a sysadmin. Now I'm grateful every day I don't have to bang my head on the desk trying to figure out how to make the argument evaluation/whitespace-splitting logic do what I want.
2001–2003
Learned it to edit "Programming PHP". It makes Perl look consistent.
2007–
I like the language a lot. Haven't used it enough to become fluent, but it feels more natural to me than Python.
2007–
I know enough to be dangerous, but not well enough to cast out my reference books.