to do then now would be retro, to do then then was very nowtro
Log in or Sign Up

Programming Languages

Programming Languages jorjun has used:

Timeline Graph
 
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
BASIC
Sinclair BASIC
6502 Assembly
BBC Basic
Z80 Assembly
C
REXX
QBasic
COBOL
RPG
Turbo Pascal
AppleScript
VisualBasic
C++
Java
bash
Python
Jython
Objective-C
XSLT
Javascript
1979–1992
Learned on commodore PET, and later on the BBC Micro in 1984. Slow run-time speeds spurred me to get into assembler.
1979–1985
Not much on the ZX-80, but definitely dabbled on the 64K ZX-Spectrum, wasn't just about playing games devised by Brit. Matthew Smith-the-Genius.
1984–1985
Learned this on the BBC Micro, wrote a disassembler so I could try and understand how RocketRaid worked :p
1984–1985
Fun making animated graphics and very simple games. Sometimes accompanied by noise :p !
1985
Dabbled on the Spectrum, lots of performance power but for lots of work. Found it more expressive than 6502
1985
Learned on IBM PC AT. Amazed at the speed, not thrilled the about crash-reboot cycles. Decided early on this was not my scene.
1985–1991
First dynamic language? Seen on the Amiga in1985, but I developed with it on the IBM AS/400 in 1990.
1988–1992
Qedit was the editor, I believe. Not a bad editor for DOS...
1989–1990
Nasty, and nobody would like to admit this one, but a fair number of large corporations loved it. Hence it was on the curriculum at Polytechnics.
1990–2004
People might be surprised how many big-name brands' information infrastructures were built using RPGII, RPGIII and RPGIV (yes ROMAN Numerals) before the internets. But a UK politician decided there should be a sudden skills shortage in the UK market. It was like sudden death meets homelessness. Be warned, you never quite know when your favourite programming language will become involved in an international race to the bottom for labour costs...
1991–1992
Learned OOP for the first time. Productive language and elegant implementation, far better than standard Pascal.
1991–
One of those overly verbose 'friendly' languages. Did very little with it, besides recording Finder actions and checking the result.
1992
Scratched an application itch I had with this language, liked the PASCAL similarities, otherwise dropped this one in mild disgust after just a few months.
1992
I gave it a whole year of my time, and some serious study, had great results with some simple animation on a PowerPC Mac -wow the speed. But juggling with knives was not my idea of fun. People who code in this language should be paid danger money for their mental health.
1996–1998
Bought ££ heaps of the books, jumped over numerous buggy implementation hurdles. Missed out on the massive corporate jobs bandwagon.
1997–
This thing stinks. Seriously, it is only for haxx0rs who have low self esteem. It's a bit like all that obtuse accountant terminology. As if you would want steal an accountant's job, I ask yer... use PYTHON
1998–
This is probably the least nerdy language out there at the moment. Was great to meet Scientists, and other non-tech-heads at the Euro conference 2009.
2000–2001
Some productive results with this, and from that moment I would not code another single line of Java
2002
Did learn enough to write a simple Mac freeware app' during first years of house arrest, when time was on my hands. Found it a tad too much like C++ to actually enjoy...
2008
I think this was when XML jumped the shark.
2009–
Patiently waiting for this one to go away. Can't muster enthusiasm for it, one of those necessary evils, I guess.