to do then now would be retro, to do then then was very nowtro
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Programming Languages

Programming Languages twhitton has used:

Timeline Graph
 
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
C
Java
bash
Perl
PHP
Ruby
AWK
Python
Javascript
LISP
Haskell
Scheme
Erlang
Clojure
ActionScript
1995–
C was my first programming experience. Unfortunately, I didn't start with K&R or any formalized instruction. Instead, I poured over the docs included with the Borland C compiler I'd downloaded from a local BBS and painstakingly assembled a Pong program. The fact that it worked is a small miracle considering that I had no idea what I was doing. I've been back and forth with C ever since.
1999–
I learned Java in college and never used it again until recently. Now I use it daily to write software for mobile phones. It's full of ceremony, hard to love, and klunky as hell, but it gets the job done. For a taste of real pain, try Java Lite (J2ME) instead of the full flavored Java 6.
1999–
Sysadmin scripts... Lots of them. I've written more than a few deployment systems in Bash. I still couldn't tell you the proper syntax for a conditional. I write bash with a reference nearby. It gets the job done.
1999–
Ah, the old aptly titled swiss army chainsaw. The first truly agile language I've ever learned. Coming from C to Perl was like going from a match to a flame thrower. Probably not the best choice for large applications, but that never stopped me. I still use Perl to tear through text but not much else these days.
1999–
Oh god... no... the horror.
1999–
I hopped on the Ruby train just as it was leaving the station. In the good old days, docs were hard to find, and the going was rough, but friendly hackers on Usenet helped me along. I still believe Ruby is the best object oriented scripting language around and use it regularly.
2000–
I have a small handful of one-liners that I couldn't live without.
2000–
I've written a lot of code in Python. It's a very solid language, but I have a hard time getting excited about it. I'm really not sure why, but I have a hard time trusting languages with broken lambdas.
2000–
Honestly, I've never really learned Javascript. I generally crib just enough information from Google to limp up and down the DOM. I know it has all kinds of nifty functional features and a bright future ahead. One day I will give it its due.
2002–
Ancient and crufty, full of antiquated names for things, and flippin' awesome. I came to Clojure via Lisp and then back to Lisp via Clojure. Feels appropriate somehow. I've also written a small Lisp interpreter which I believe is a rite of passage for any Lisper.
2008–
Man, I have tried to learn and love this language. It's like a magic wand in the hands of a beginner. So seductive but likely to destroy you... WTF is a monad anyway?! C'mon guys.
2008–
PLT dialect. Beautiful language. I haven't used it for anything serious, but it makes a mean slide show.
2008–
I spent a substantial time learning Erlang over Winter break a few years back. I read Programming Erlang cover to cover, wrote a bunch of small programs, and fully intended on writing robust servers with OTP. Those servers never happened, but I still love Erlang.
2009–
Ahh, my new favorite language. I always wanted to have the fabled Lisp epiphany, and Clojure is the closest I've come. It's pragmatic, elegant, and full of magic. Clojure is the only language that compels me to program for fun.
2010–
I just started learning AS for the explicit purpose of writing Flash games. It's great for compiling directly to a SWF file. It's not so great otherwise.