to do then now would be retro, to do then then was very nowtro
Log in or Sign Up

Programming Languages

Programming Languages brucehoult has used:

Timeline Graph
 
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
AppleSoft BASIC
Fortran
Pascal
Assembly
VAX BASIC
C
COBOL
Forth
Modula-2
LISP
BCPL
PostScript
PL/I
C++
Oberon
Dylan
Objective-C
bash
Perl
Java
Ruby
Python
Javascript
1979–1984
Not my first language! Did FORTRAN and HP and TI programmable calculators first.
1980
At high school
1980–2000
My first introduction was Apple's UCSD Pascal on the Apple ][, then in 1981 NBS Pascal and Omni Pascal on the PDP-11, 1982 VAX Pascal, 1984 Turbo Pascal, 1987 THINK Pascal, 1987 MPW Pascal, 1994 CodeWarrior Pascal. Used in Parallel with C++ for half a decade.
1980–
Have done almost everything popular except x86. 1980: 6502, 1981: Z80 and PDP11, 1982: VAX, 1983: Z8000, 1984: 6809 and 68000, 1994: PowerPC, 1999: MIPS, 2006: ARM and Thumb.
1981–1984
Used this for quick&dirty things on he VAXen at University. Years include BASIC PLUS on the PDP-11, which isn't an option.
1982–
University was Pascal/Modula2 on VAXen, but there was a C compiler, plus a Zilog System 8000 running Unix in '83. Have never stopped since. A reasonable portable assembly language.
1982–1983
At university in 1982, and then, conveniently, commercially for a summer holiday job 1982/1983.
1983–
Have used a variety of FORTH-like languages, and even created my own. Started with STOIC on a VAX in 1983, and quite a lot of Postscript from 1985 onwards.
1983–1994
Modula-2 always seemed like a better Pascal, but never really took off commercially.
1983–
1983 Franz Lisp on a VAX. Emacs Lisp since 1997. Scheme from time to time.
1983–1984
In many ways, I actually prefer BCPL to K&R C (but not ANSI or C++). I still have the manual.
1985–
In my first job I needed to produce business graphics. There was an HP plotter driven by SAS but it was crap. We got the first Apple LaserWriter and hooked it to the Data General minicomputer and I wrote PoastScript by hand, and generated it from PL/I programs. I haven't stopped using it since -- still the best way to generate graphics on Linux and OSX.
1985–1987
In my first job my first task was to buy a compiler for the Data General MV10000 -- the choices were FORTRAN, COBOL, or PL/I. The choice was easy...
1988–
I'd been following the language and CFront development on BIX for several years, and was very excited by the language. I bought Zortech C++ as soon as it came out. In 1989 Apple released their CFront port and I switched from Pascal for all my work. By late 1992 I was already becoming frustrated with the limitations and learned about Apple's new "Dylan" language.
1989
I remember playing with the ETH release for the Mac. The language seemed like a worthwhile improvement on Modula-2 (and Pascal), but the integrated editing/execution environment was much more interesting! An incredibly fast compiler at the time, and produced good code too.
1994–
Got the free book in 1992, and then Apple's developer release for 68k (and then PowerPC). Used the "Marlais" interpreter too. Joined the team maintaining the open-sourced Gwydion Dylan in late 1998. Have used Dylan to enter the ICFP programing contest from 2000 - 2008, winning prizes in 2001, 2003, and 2005.
1997–
I'd followed the development of NeXT with interest, and even played with one in 1989, but didn't get to really play with Objective C++ at home until a developer release of Rhapsody for PowerPC Macs in 1997.
1997–
I started playing with Linux on a Pentium 60 and Solaris on a SPARC ELC.
1997–
Learned for a consulting job. Still write at least one 1-liner every day.
1998–
Got hired on a short term contract to do C++ programming, arrived and was told I'd be doing Java instead. Hilarity ensued. Later helped write a static compiler for J2ME.
2001–
In April 2001 I visited Chicago. The guy I was staying with handed me the Ruby book, I handed him a Dylan book... I still prefer Perl for quick&dirty but Ruby is at least better than Python.
2002–
Mostly just tweaking existing programs e.g. SCONS. I prefer Perl for quick&dirty, Dylan for real programs.
2009–
Tweaked existing things before this, but didn't seriously learn the language until working at Mozilla.