to do then now would be retro, to do then then was very nowtro
Log in or Sign Up

Programming Languages

Programming Languages mnulli has used:

Timeline Graph
 
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
Autocoder (IBM 1401)
Fortran
SNOBOL
Simula
Algol 60
LISP
MACRO-11
6502 Assembly
Forth
MACRO-32
6809 Assembly
C
DCL
68k Assembly
LOGO
MIPS Assembly
x86 Assembly
Bourne Shell
1966–1969
Used on both 1440 and 1401, similar but not identical machines.
1966–1980
I'm assuming that this refers to what we called "Fortran with Format" or "Fortran II". I used it on the IBM 1620 and 1130, CDC 6400, PDP-11, Vax.
1969–1971
Snobol IV. In a compiler class and for a little bit of other fooling around. One of those languages that challenges your notion of what programming languages look like.
1970
Simula-67, for one class :-)
1970–1977
Some explanation is in order. I was introduced to Algol 60 at U.C. Berkeley, where an integer subset was the subject of our compiler-writing course. We wrote the "front end" (In SNOBOL IV) to compile that subset to "AOC" (what we might now call a "virtual machine"), then produced CDC 6400 object code from AOC "however we could", which in my case was near-profane (ab)use of the Macro assembler. The 1977 date was when a friend and I re-implemented AOC for the 6502, but then drifted off to use much of the infrastructure for FORTH, whose VM is a lot simpler.
1970
Only in one class. CDC6400 LISP, which differed from "normal" LISP 1.5 by having CSR in addition to CAR and CDR. And in other "delightful" ways.
1975–1984
Not entirely sure about the start. I did some assembly programming on the -11 in 1974 or 1975, but that was under DOS (yes, of course DEC had one :-). Definitely using MACRO-11 on RT-11 by 1976
1976–2000
Not sure 2000 will stay my end year :-) I've lost track of how many variants of 6502 assembly I've used, E.G. the very simple one that was part of the Rockwell System 65, the FORTH assembler that was part of my first FORTH re-target, A bunch of macros from MACRO-11, and finally a set of macros on top of that to provide a "HLL65", akin to Wirth's PL360.
1977–2005
2005 "so far" :-). Started with DECUS FORTH for the PDP-11. A friend and I made a 6502 version, used it quite a bit internally. Moved to fig FORTH when it was clear that was "the future". Most recently used for "bare-board" diags on PPC systems.
1978–1998
1978–1979
Comment is wrong on at least one point, based apparently on a mistake in Wikipedia. The 6800 already had A and B accumulators. The interesting thing about the 6809 was that if you wanted to do something, the first way you thought of was probably pretty close to the best you were going to do. Compare and contrast to the 6502 where serious skull sweat could be rewarded with significant performance gains.
1979–
My main language, still. What finally got me off FORTRAN :-)
1979–1999
1982–2000
Not really sure about the start. Mostly used on the 68010, which was the version of the 68K that could actually do VM. Also wrote a assembly->assembly "de-pessimizer" for the output of the GreenHills compiler.
1982
On Atari 800. Hey, I got the cart for free. :-)
1995–
just a bit, on R3K and R4K. Not sure exactly when, but in the 1990s
1998–2001
Oddly, I skipped from 8008 assembly in 1972 to "boot and get into protected mode" code for a Pentium equivalent in 1998, with only one instance of x86 assembly between, fixing a bug in the ESIX select() library call, circa 1990.
2001–
OK, so mostly this is now really bash under the hood, but I try to avoid bash-isms. The only "new" feature I use is shell functions. Been bit too many times...