to do then now would be retro, to do then then was very nowtro
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Programming Languages

Programming Languages Da_Nuke has used:

Timeline Graph
 
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
VisualBasic
C
Java
C#
PL/SQL
MATLAB
Ladder logic
bash
PHP
Assembly
2003–
Ah, my first programming language ^^ I took it in high school. It was thanks to it that I found my vocation for computers: I found it very fucking easy, but everybody else just kept saying it was the hardest thing in the world (which makes sense if you consider the engineering homeroom doubled as the design homeroom, and also because they taught it to those from business ¬¬). I eventually found out how much Visual Basic 6 fucking sucked, but at least I managed to make a little software project in high school that scored me $150 dollars :D The latest one I learned was Visual Basic .net. I liked it, now Visual Basic was a real programming language instead of some scripting bullshit :3
2005–
C is pretty much one of the "required" languages that all programmers and computer scientists in the world must be taught. And with good reason, it's low-level enough to let you learn about the computer's inner workings to some degree, while still being high-level enough to make it not as mind-warping as assembly.
2006–
Was taught this one on OOP class. It's clunky and I fucking hate having to catch all and every single exception (to the extent that I have no qualms with doing the ultimate sin of surrounding everything with a big-ass "try-catch", but it does the job when doing larger programming projects where you have no time to worry about memory management :3
2007–
Took it at college. It was good... problem is, I took it with ASP .net and its fucking stateful pages bullshit that was probably approved by the project leader while he was high on booze and weed. It's the only explanation D:<
2007–
Learned it at college. I found it the easiest language in the world, it's all about knowing how relationships work and then it's just learning the syntax.
2008–
I first took this one in signal analysis class. Good for its intended use as a mathematical programming language. When working with tons of numbers it's hard to debug though... I once helped a friend with a MATLAB code that ran a big motherfucking multi-million iterations loop, andthe only way to debug was to observe your code. My real MATLAB trial was in data transmission class though... I did in that class a simulation of a BPSK-QAM transmitter that sends a file through a headphone cable, it was pretty ballin'. I left that class a genius at MATLAB and it looks like I'm set for even more years of MATLAB...
2008–
I took a little course about PLC programming while looking for a job. I didn't really liked it because I found it like some bastardized form of digital electronics, but oh well, at least I have a job credential that might come in handy on hard times :3
2008–
Took it at college as well. I just wrote a few simple scripts. Didn't really liked it, I found it a bit too clunky.
2008–
Learned it myself because I absolutely hated ASP .net with C# and its stateful pages schtick and I had to do some web services homework or something. It sucks, but when you can't use a better language it gets the job done IMO. (A little story: a friend of mine took PHP web development... and he's a marketing student who knew zilch about computers. Somehow he managed to pull it with 70% ^^)
2010–
Intel 8051 assembly here. It fucking rules because unlike high-level languages, you know exactly what your program is doing at all times, and because using it is using hardware directly. The only lower-level thing that exists is VHDL and that's because it's a hardware description language, not a programming language.